Connecticut psychology experts state isolation causing mental health emergency

Isolation has been on everyone’s mind and a part of everyone’s day. Job loss, school cancellations, and loved ones potentially being affected by the Coronavirus, the future holds uncertainty, fear, and a variety of mental health illnesses lurking about.

“It is a perfect storm of psychological trauma,” said Dr. John Santopietro, who directs Hartford HeathCare’s mental health treatment network.” (Click for link)


This illness doesn’t target a specific group of people or an age range, but is universal and has the ability to affect anyone. With that, it is important to utilize online therapy, talking with loved ones, exploring hobbies, and staying active as best you can. Luckily, in our current age, hospitals and mental health groups have been taking part in the online world of health care so that people have access to these vital classes, therapy sessions, and variety of knowledge that one can obtain at the click of a button.


Thousands of individuals in Connecticut have taken part in online video sessions in hopes of curbing the affects of isolation, social distancing, and the shock of a complete lifestyle change. In addition to that, the hardship some are facing with loved one becoming ill, the underlying precautions people are taking with others, even there own families, is mentally taxing to say the least. What was once a hug or handshake has now turned into a nod, a wave, or even an elbow bump. How long will that last?

It is vital that everyone look into ways of coping with this area of their lives. Looking into state health websites and mental health advocates and what they offer for dealing with mental health illnesses during this time is something we should all explore.


People are wired to interact with others, and to take away their primary form of social interaction breeds a new form of illness that no one was ready for. Social distancing has been taking a toll on everyone. And we need to realize that it has a near perfect way of causing stress, anxiety, and depression. Not to mention that those with underlying mental health diagnoses face a completely new uphill battle, with new ways of creeping into their everyday lives.


Mental health is sparked on fear, anxiety, and through so much more than just isolation. Our minds create stories, create fears and experiences that when we were actively engaged outside the confines of our homes, didn’t affect us. But given the current circumstances, we are but left to think, and think, and think some more.
But, in contrast, there is an upside to isolation.

People have realized that they have more time on their hands. And with that time, many have learned to utilize it. Work that has been put off is getting done, relationships that are experiencing lulls or bumps in the road have the only option to put it in the limelight and figure it out. Projects pushed to the side or hobbies left to collect dust are being dusted off and taken up again. People are starting to understand what makes them happy when the majority of their happiness was taken away.


This time is undoubtedly difficult to get through, but also crucial for those of us who have had difficulty in finding out what makes us really happy. We have been given time. Time to reflect, time to rebuild, time to love in new ways, and time to become stronger, not physically, but mentally.


We are, quite literally, all in this together. So remember, you are not alone. We will get through this, together, and we will become a stronger world because of it.

Accredited Link:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-news-mental-health-coronavirus-20200412-rglz6mqyc5br3lazuaxgg4yp74-story.html%3foutputType=amp

Published by thementalhealthminute

The Mental Health Minute was started as a way for individuals to come together and talk about their own mental health struggles, as well as seek advise from others on how to deal with these areas of their life.

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